Put your energy where it matters most

grid_dill_text
Dill and Geller’s segmentation

I have written about the pitfalls of campaigning, like marginalisation and delivering the message. Also I have freely expressed my delight about the segmentation studies, the wonderful work of Anable and Dill (building on Geller‘s proposition). These studies show us who is out there, what they currently do and what thoughts and intentions they have. But most importantly for building a broader base, the segmentations show us where the positive and the negative energies split.

Knowing this is vitally essential for building support. It is crucial for campaigners (the community-building type and the political activist) and for decision makers alike. I again and again sit in meeting where people whinge about “the motorist”. It’s good to have a moan every now and again, there are healing properties… and it can be rapport-forming too, I would agree. But this mustn’t become regular and settle in… in due course a whinge should also be followed by action (phases: awareness, knowledge accumulation through to making a decision for action).

grid_anable_text
Anable’s segmentation

So, I hope you find this tip useful. Go where the positive energy can be found. Do not waste your time to try and convert people who will most likely never get it (Anable’s die-hard drivers 19%, and Dill-Geller’s no way no how 25%). I have to say it rather quite often to people I talk to: it is okay to disagree. Deep down we know we cannot agree with everyone all the time.

But here’s the thing

All this does necessitate you knowing WHY you are doing something (decision makers, vision) or WHAT change you want to see happen (activists, eye on the ball).

Don’t waste your time. Familiarise yourself with the population segmentation, and use it for building broader consensus. It’s easy, really. I have removed the negatives. So here are the two studies each highlighting the support that can be built (as even the complacent car addict is prepared to listen to well-made arguments, according to the definition).

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s